Weapon Pic: Taurus DT .357 Magnum Revolver

Taurus DT .357 Magnum Revolver

 

Taurus makes some good handguns. This one at first appears to be kind of an amalgam — what is it? Four different finishes (matte, blued steel, rubber, brass). But somehow, it all holds together for me. It’s like “Here is a thing that’s meant to do a job, and we’ve been a little crazy with it, but after all of that, don’t you just LIKE it?”

I do, Taurus. I do.

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Weapon pic: Randall Arkansas Toothpick

I saw this type of weapon for sale for a lot less, did some research and it turned out it was sourced from inferior steel and from a location that doesn’t have the greatest reputation. The pic of it is beautiful, but I’m not even going to link it here because it would just be a bad deal and I don’t want to tempt anyone.

Here’s the real deal. It’s way out of the price range I’d be comfortable with, but if you’re really into knives, Randall is the way to go.

The blade is 13″ and it weighs at least a pound. They were used by frontiersmen and also by Confederate soldiers. Randall’s quality is unparalleled. If you have $665.00 to spend…

Okay, okay, here’s the original pic of the lesser quality one (a mere $199). I mean, it’s beautiful, but if I want to drop a couple hundred dollars on beautiful, I’ll go commission a painting from a starving artist.

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Awesome firearm picture: Wilson Combat 1911

I’m in awe of this custom 1911 by Wilson Combat. It’s gorgeous.

Even their base weapons are far, far out of my price range, let alone these custom jobs.

But just look at it!

In case you have gajillions of dollars and don’t know what to do with them: https://www.wilsoncombat.com/

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Weapon of the Week: Beretta Over/Under 12 Gauge

Beretta is an Italian gun manufacturer that has been in business since 1526. 1526! They make everything from tiny, super-concealable, relatively inexpensive .22 pistols (I have one) to high end shotguns. That’s what we’re looking at today. Every year, my employer takes the entire office on a ski resort trip for two days. One of the activities is sporting clay shooting. The resort (Seven Springs) uses the most excellent Beretta 12 gauge over/under shotgun. Mechanically, they are very cool, with the first pull of the trigger firing the upper barrel and the second firing the lower.

But really, these things are more like works of art than weapons. Take a look:

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Weapon of the Week: American-180

This thing is hilarious. It’s a machine gun that fires .22LR at up to 1,200 rounds per minute. Just, stupid stupid stupid. Rimfires are unreliable, and I get that they’re better than nothing, but still. Look at this:

From the Wiki article (which I usually don’t quote but this shit is funny):

“…testing demonstrated that automatic fire could penetrate even concrete and bulletproof vests from cumulative damage. However, the target would have to remain still for an improbable amount of time to allow the cumulative damage to amass in the same area to achieve this.”

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Weapon of the Week: Wakizashi

The wakizashi is the Japanese short sword.

Seen here is the crappy one that I own. I say it’s crappy, because this is the kind of thing that you can spend infinite amounts of money on, and this one was the cheapest possible one I could get that met my weak criteria. Those criteria were: full tang, carbon (not stainless) steel.

I’m not going to go into the history of the wakizashi, because other web sites do that just fine and people get #cra about their Japanese sword trivia and I don’t need them writing letters, you know?

What I will tell you is this. You can impressively cut through full gallon jugs of water with it, leaving them “in place” with the water pouring out on all sides. You can saber a bottle of champagne with it. It’s sharp enough that if you got in close quarters with someone and the edge got pressed against either you or them, it would quite happily make a new hole in your body with hardly any force behind it.

Here’s something you won’t read on other websites. It is entirely possible that last year someone was involved in an office prank at Google, one component of which was that during a particular meeting, someone joined that meeting via videoconference from their backyard, wearing a tuxedo jacket and a full-head bunny mask. They had a wakizashi in hand. Maybe even this very wakizashi you see before you. For the length of the meeting they engaged in various shenanigans, without comment, steaming it live into the meeting, including blindly throwing fruit into the air and cutting it to pieces with the sword before it hit the ground.

This may or may not have happened.

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Weapon of the Week: Marlin 1895/444

 

 

 

This is the Marlin 1895/444. Based on designs from the 1890s, this is a modern update that fires the Marlin .444 cartridge. Guides and scouts in bear country carry these, because the Marlin .444 is bad ass and kills bears.

The cool thing about this gun though is that the design is lever action. After you fire a cartridge, you flip the whole trigger guard downward then back up to chamber another round. The rounds are held one after the other in the tube below the barrel. If you know guns, you already know what lever action is. If you don’t, you’ve probably seen them used in westerns.

The lever action is an interesting holdover from its invention in the 1890s. At the time, everyone else had single-fire weapons. You had to entirely reload every time you fired. It took a while. The lever action repeater changed all of that.

Since then, there are more and better designs for things like this. A bolt action rifle is more durable and more accurate. A semi-automatic rifle has a higher rate of fire and reloads more easily. So why do these guns persist?

I think it’s because they’re cool. And just look at this thing. It’s gorgeous.

I want one. 😀

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Weapon of the Week: The Fictional Sentient Weapon

If you dig through TV Tropes, you’ll find several categories that relate to Fox in the LFBD universe: talking weapons, empathic weapons, etc. None of them fit exactly, because while Fox is a weapon, he’s actually a lot more than that. It did get me thinking about the trope in general though. Maybe the most well-known sentient weapon is Elric’s sword Stormbringer. While Stormbringer is just a fictional weapon, I’ll allow it, because I like the artwork attached.

Elric

This is from a comic series. I liked the original books by Moorcock, though I can’t vouch for these comics. The artwork, however, is great. I love this take on Elric — usually he is presented as very muscular, and even heroic. Here, it’s clear why the others of his race who prized strength, elegance and cold beauty despised him. And of course, there’s Stormbringer, sucking the soul out of some giant nasty thing.

 

 

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Weapon of the week

Glass knives.

Glass knife

Apparently, in addition to making stone blades for things like spears and knives, pre-historic humans also used naturally occurring glass and glass-like rocks such as obsidian. The advantage was that the cutting edge was far thinner on glass that had been knapped (chipped off in small pieces by a hammer or other striking tool) than on a stone equivalent. Depending on the materials involved, a stone one probably be more durable overall, but it’s all trade-offs, you know?

In Neal Stephenson’s amazing Snow Crash (one of my top 5 favorite books) one of the various antagonists is a master at crafting and using glass blades.

The modern versions of these knives — made by paleo groups — don’t look all that durable to me. I’d rather have steel. Of course, if glass were really better than steel for knife-making, the worlds knives would be made of glass and I’d be writing a post about the curiosity of the steel knife. But it’s not.

Anyway, these are cool, and I kind of what to try to make one.

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How lethal is the .22 LR round?

This video is a little long-winded, so I’ll summarize. They first shoot .22 shorts at a 1/2 inch pine board at close range. The old military standard is that if a round can cleanly penetrate the board, it’s considered potentially lethal at that distance. The .22 short — an extremely low-powered round — easily penetrates at 10′, and again at 40′. They move onto .22 LR, and end up going out to 440 yards (yes, a quarter mile). That’s far past the effective accuracy of the round. It still cleanly penetrated. I was expecting it to fall off by that distance.

The best bit for me is in the last two minutes when the gentlemen are discussing the conclusions of the tests. The older fellow says that when medical care isn’t readily available: “If you get a hole in you that you weren’t born with, you’re probably going to die.” I love his delivery.

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